FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 04, 2013

Deaths and Injuries to Children Under 16 Still Very Alarming

Statement of Concerned families for ATV Safety Upon the Release of CPSC’s 2011 ATV Death and Injury Data

Turner, Oregon – With the release today of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission’s (CPSC)  2011 ATV Report, we are very concerned about the percentage of deaths and injuries of children. We are concerned about both those deaths and injuries suffered by children under the age of 16 and those suffered by children under the age of 12 years old.  This has become a very serious trend that must be addressed immediately.

While the report shows that 57 children under the age of 16 lost their lives due to an ATV crash in 2011 compared to 82 children in 2010, it is important to note that these totals are not complete and are added throughout the year.  The very alarming fact to Concerned Families for ATV Safety is that 47% of these deaths were of children under the age of 12. 
CPSC estimates 29,000 children under the age of 16 were injured in 2011 compared to 28,300 in 2010.  This constitutes an increase in which 15,100 (52%), of those children were under the age of 12 years old.

Concerned Families for ATV Safety’s analysis of today’s data finds that although the number of deaths to children may have slightly decreased for now, the percentage of the total ATV deaths to children has increased compared to 2009 and 2010.   Furthermore, the number of injuries to children has already exceeded those of 2010.  This problem will continue until there are stricter enforcements in place that will keep children off of ATV's. 

The weight and stability of all ATV's must be studied more closely. We continue to see children die or become severely injured from ATV's, and that is something which we can stop if people realize that ATV's are not meant for children.  They are not a sport that children should be participating in and they are not toys.  ATV's are motorized vehicles and should be treated as such.  The numbers in the 2011 ATV report show far too many needless and preventable deaths, especially to children. 

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 01, 2010

Recent ATV Injury and Death Data from U.S. CPSC Doesn’t Tell the Full Story

Statement of Concerned Families for ATV Safety

The recently released ATV death and injury data from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) does not appear to be telling the full story when it comes to the impact of ATV death and injuries. While we read the recent release of the ATV Death and Injuries reported by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, we were alarmed because one would think that ATV deaths and Injuries have significantly decreased for children under 16 years of age.  However, what has failed to be highlighted is the fact that they the CPSC has just started compiling this data differently.  Some of the incidents that used to be included in this report have been moved to another report.  Recreational off highway vehicles, such as the Yamaha Rhino, which have been the cause of many deaths this past year, are now in its own category, not in its usual category with ATV’s as it has been in prior years.  While it looks very promising that ATV deaths are on the decline, it is truly a much smaller decline then is actually the case. This is important because we have a lot of work to do to prevent Deaths and injuries caused by ATVS and while the data does indicate a small decline, it doesn’t mean we can stop working to protect children from the hazards posed by ATVs.
ATV’s are still killing and injuring thousands of people each year and a good part of them are children under the age of 16.  We at Concerned Families for ATV Safety try to keep track of deaths that occur to children under 16.  Our calculations were higher than those from CPSC’s data even when we subtracted the known deaths from ROHVs or UTVs, (the machines that are no longer listed in this report).   Unfortunately, we don’t believe that the actual decrease of deaths to children under the age of 16 is in any way statistically significant.

CPSC is responsible for overseeing these products that are killing and injuring more people than any other product they oversee.  We are hopeful that with new laws, more extensive public education and a new administration that we can change these numbers to where they really count.  There are still too many children that are becoming victims to these machines that they should never be on in the first place.

Here is a link to the most recent ATV Death and Injury Data from CPSC:  http://www.cpsc.gov/library/foia/foia10/os/atv2008.pdf

Here is a link to Concerned Families for ATV Safety’s web site: www.atvsafetynet.org

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Concerned Families for ATV Safety is dedicated to reducing injuries and deaths among children driving/riding powerful All Terrain Vehicles.  www.atvsafetynet.org

 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 18, 2007

Concerned Families Releases New Study on Child ATV and Bicycle Injuries Showing Skyrocketing Hospitalization Rates and Medical Costs

ATV-Related Medical Costs in Children Rise nearly 200% in 5 Years, Hospitalization Rate Increases Nearly 70%, Confirming Industry’s Voluntary Standards Do Not Work

WASHINGTON, DC – Concerned Families for ATV Safety (http://www.atvsafetynet.org) today released the results of a new health costs study, “Death and Injury Resulting from ATV and Bicycle Crashes: a 5-Year Comparison of National Prevalence and Cost Estimates among Children and Adults” that shows skyrocketing hospitalization rates and medical costs from child ATV accidents from 2000 to 2004. The study was conducted by Dr. Jim Helmkamp, PhD, MS, FACE (West Virginia University).

The U.S. ATV industry is currently pushing a proposal in Congress introduced by Senator Ted Stevens (AK) that would make the current voluntary industry safety standards mandatory for all ATV manufacturers, including those made overseas in China. However, as the data from this study indicates, this approach – voluntary or not – simply has not protected our children.

Key Findings

The National Sporting Goods Association estimates that 14.2 million children ages 7 to 17 ride bicycles in the United States, while the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) says there are about 2.2 million ATV riders under the age of 16. Even though roughly seven times as many children ride bikes:

Hospitalization Rate & Number of Injuries

The hospitalization rate for children under 16 in ATV accidents increased 67% from 2000 to 2004, while the hospitalization rate for children in bicycle accidents decreased 12%.

• Similarly, the number of children sent to the hospital because of an ATV accident increased 70% during this same time period, while the number of children sent to the hospital because of a bicycle accident went down 12%.

Medical Costs

The medical costs associated with child ATV accidents increased 196% over the five year period to $71 million in 2004, while the medical costs for child bicycle accidents went up 32% to $92 million in 2004.

The average cost of a child being sent to the hospital from an ATV accident is 44% higher than for bicycles - $19,706 in 2004 for ATVs compared to $13,713 for bicycles.

Additional data compiled and analyzed by Dr. Helmkamp determined the following:

• In the United States, it is estimated that among children (15 and under) 6 were admitted to hospitals each day in 2000 for ATV-related injuries increasing to 10 per day in 2004.

• Among adults (16 or older) these figures were 17 per day in 2000 and 32 per day in 2004.

Preliminary Findings

Preliminary findings from the study, which were released in July, included the following:

• From 2000-2004, an average of 171 children under 16 died annually in ATV crashes compared to 157 from bicycle crashes. During this 5-year period:

• The number of deaths and death rate for child ATV riders increased 24%, while the number of child bicycle deaths declined 18% and the death rate decreased 17%.

• Meanwhile, the total economic costs related to the youthful ATV deaths increased 45% over the 5-year period (from $673 million to $973 million) while costs decreased 5% for the young bicycle riders ($776 million to $738 million).

“There’s really no reason to avoid common sense, low-cost steps to reduce and prevent the number of injuries and deaths among kids from ATV accidents,” said Sue Rabe, co-founder of Concerned Families for ATV Safety. “Our organization believes Congress needs to conduct a thorough investigation into the full costs of child ATV accidents with an eye toward passing the recommended safety standards of the American Academy of Pediatrics – standards that keep children under 16 off these powerful vehicles which can weigh up to a 1,000 pounds and travel at speeds in excess of 70 mph. Congress has the power to reign in the costs to society associated with these unnecessary and preventable tragedies.”

“This new study puts to rest several false claims made the ATV industry,” said Carolyn Anderson, co-founder of Concerned Families for ATV Safety. “First, some claim that when someone else’s child gets killed on an ATV, it is solely their problem, but the findings our study show that these accidents do come at great costs to all of us.”

“Second, the ATV industry argues that the number of child deaths increases each year because ridership keeps going up, but once again, the findings in this study show this not to be true. In fact, the death rate is increasing at a disproportionately high rate. And third, the U.S. ATV industry wants to make the current voluntary standards mandatory because they argue that unsafe Chinese models are flooding the U.S. market and are the main reason for child deaths and serious injuries from ATV accidents. If the industry has evidence to back up this claim, they should let us see it. The truth is that since 2000, 97% of ATV recalls came from the same companies that are complaining about Chinese imports,” continued Ms. Anderson.

This study was funded by the Arabella Legacy Fund, a private charitable organization that also supports the work of Concerned Families for ATV Safety. It was prepared by Dr. Jim Helmkamp, PhD, MS, FACE (West Virginia University).

Attached are several charts illustrating the key findings of the study.

- 30 -

Concerned Parents for ATV Safety is a network of parents dedicated to reducing injuries and death among children driving powerful All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs). We offer support to victims' families and provide families with information and resources to make informed decisions about their children and ATVs. Through public education we work to raise awareness of the need for adequate, common sense safety standards that keep children under 16 off ATVs, and for enforcement of ATV laws.



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Concerned Families for ATV Safety Releases New Health Cost Study on Child ATV and Bicycle Fatalities Showing Industry's Voluntary Standards Do Not Work

Preliminary Findings Indicate ATV Child Dangers on the Rise, Refute Premise of New Legislation Proposed by Sen. Ted Stevens to Make Industry Voluntary Standards Mandatory

WASHINGTON, DC –

Concerned Families for ATV Safety today released the preliminary findings of a new health costs study (http://www.atvsafetynet.org/parents.php?page=compare) that clearly shows the ATV industry's voluntary safety standards do not work. The study, which compares trends and financial costs to society of child ATV and bicycle fatalities between 2000 and 2004, shows a significant increase in child ATV deaths and death rate, as well as medical costs and overall economic costs related to these deaths, while child bike deaths and related costs have declined.

The U.S. ATV industry is current pushing a proposal in Congress recently introduced by Senator Ted Stevens (AK) that would make the current voluntary industry safety standards mandatory for all ATV manufacturers, including those made overseas in China. However, at the data from this study indicates, this approach - voluntary or not - simply has not protected our children.

Key Findings

From 2000-2004, an average of 171 children under 16 died annually in ATV crashes compared to 157 from bicycle crashes. During this 5-year period:

The number of deaths and death rate for child ATV riders increased 24%, while the number of child bicycle deaths declined 18% and the death rate decreased 17%.

Meanwhile, the total economic costs related to the youthful ATV deaths increased 45% over the 5-year period (from $673 million to $973 million) while costs decreased 5% for the young bicycle riders ($776 million to $738 million).

Medical costs related to child ATV deaths increased nearly 70% while medical costs related to child bicycle deaths decreased 20%.

Quality of life costs related to child ATV deaths increased by 44% while quality of life costs related to child bicycle deaths decreased by 4%.

Costs due to work loss from child ATV deaths increased by 46% while work loss costs related to child bicycle deaths decreased by approximately 6%.

"There's really no reason to avoid common sense, low-cost steps to reduce and prevent the number of injuries and deaths among kids from ATV accidents," said Sue Rabe, co-founder of Concerned Families for ATV Safety. "Our organization believes Congress needs to conduct a thorough investigation into the full costs of child ATV accidents with an eye toward passing the recommended safety standards of the American Academy of Pediatrics - standards that keep children under 16 off these powerful vehicles."

"This new study puts to rest several false claims made the ATV industry," said Carolyn Anderson, co-founder of Concerned Families for ATV Safety. "First, some claim that when someone else’s child gets killed on an ATV, it is solely their problem, but the findings our study show that these accidents do come at great costs to all of us."

"Second, the ATV industry argues that the number of child deaths increases each year because ridership keeps going up, but once again, the findings in this study show this not to be true. In fact, the death rate is increasing at a disproportionately high rate. And third, the U.S. ATV industry wants to make the current voluntary standards mandatory because they argue that unsafe Chinese models are flooding the U.S. market and are the main reason for child deaths and serious injuries from ATV accidents. If the industry has evidence to back up this claim, they should let us see it. The truth is that since 2000, 97% of ATV recalls came from the same companies that are complaining about Chinese imports," continued Ms. Anderson.

This study was funded by the Arabella Legacy Fund, a private charitable organization that also supports the work of Concerned Families for ATV Safety. It was prepared by Dr. Jim Helmkamp, PhD, MS, FACE.

To view the findings of the study, please visit: http://www.atvsafetynet.org/parents.php?page=compare

- 30 -

Concerned Parents for ATV Safety is a network of parents dedicated to reducing injuries and death among children driving powerful All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs). We offer support to victims' families and provide families with information and resources to make informed decisions about their children and ATVs. Through public education we work to raise awareness of the need for adequate, common sense safety standards that keep children under 16 off ATVs, and for enforcement of ATV laws.



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 9, 2007

Concerned Families for ATV Safety Releases Web Video Highlighting Need for Common Sense Safety Standards

Video Questions Industry Lobbyist's "Outrageous and Irresponsible" Comments About ATV Age Limits

WASHINGTON, DC – Concerned Families for ATV Safety today released a new web video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=czqg-03M7L0) about last week's Senate Commerce Committee hearing on ATV Safety, highlighting the urgent need for common sense safety standards to keep children under 16 off powerful and deadly ATVs. The video raises serious questions about comments made by ATV Industry attorney David Murray regarding ATV age limits during the hearing.

In response to a question posed Sen. Mark Pryor (D-AR), Chair of the Consumer Affairs, Insurance, and Automotive Safety subcommittee about what age is too young to ride an ATV, Mr. Murray said, "[the industry's] voluntary standard specifies that the smallest units -- the Y-6 units -- are for ages 6 and above." Mr. Murray made this comment despite broad support from pediatricians and the medical community that because children under 16 do not have the physical and mental capacity to ride an ATVs safely, they should be kept off these powerful vehicles.

"Mr. Murray's comments that it's ok to put a 6-year-old behind the wheels of a powerful, 100-pound All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) -- that causes of tens of thousands of serious injuries and deaths each year among children -- are simply outrageous and irresponsible," said Carolyn Anderson, Concerned Families for ATV Safety Co-Founder. Instead of marketing these dangerous vehicles to children, the ATV industry ought to adopt the common sense safety standards recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics -- standards that keep children under 16 off these vehicles and require teenagers to have a license to drive ATVs, just as we do for cars."

"Perhaps Mr. Murray knows something that pediatricians don't know, but we know that the industry he represents is making a product that costs our country billions each year in medical and economic costs," said Sue Rabe, Concerned Families for ATV Safety Co-Founder. "Congress has the power to reign in these costs and protect children. Congress needs to act now."

To view the video, please visit http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=czqg-03M7L0 .

-30-

Concerned Parents for ATV Safety is a network of parents dedicated to reducing injuries and death among children driving powerful All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs). We offer support to victim's families and provide families with information and resources to make informed decisions about their children and ATVs. Through public education we work to raise awareness of the need for adequate, common sense safety standards that keep children under 16 off ATVs, and for enforcement of ATV laws. For more information, please visit our web site at atvsafetynet.org.



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 9, 2007

Concerned Families for ATV Safety Calls on Senate Commerce Committee to Pass Common Sense Safety Standards That Keep Children under 16 off ATVs

Launches New Web Site with Facts about why ATVs and Children Don’t Mix

WASHINGTON, DC – Concerned Families for ATV Safety today called on members of the Senate Commerce Committee to address the growing problem of child injuries and deaths caused by All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) accidents. To coincide with today’s Consumer Affairs, Insurance, and Automotive Safety subcommittee hearing on this topic, the organization’s co-founders, Carolyn Anderson and Sue Rabe sent a letter (see below) to all subcommittee members surveying their views on the issue, and urging them to adopt common sense safety standards recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics – standards that keep children under 16 off these vehicles and require teenagers to have a license to drive ATVs, just as we do for cars. 

Additionally, Concerned Families launched a new web site today (www.atvsafetynet.org), featuring key facts about why ATVs and children don’t mix, resources for parents to make informed decisions about their children’s safety, and an interactive map with a sampling of reported child ATV deaths for 2007 and previous years.

In 2005, Ms. Anderson of Brockton, Massachusetts and Ms. Rabe or Turner, Oregon, along with Carol Keezer of Defiance, Ohio, founded Concerned Families for ATV Safety after each of their children had been killed driving ATVs.  They were brought together by shared grief and decided to create the organization as a way to offer support to victim’s families and raise awareness of the need for adequate, common sense safety standards that keep children under age 16 off ATVs, and for enforcement of existing ATV laws. 

“ATVs are important to many lifestyles, but pediatricians say they’re unsafe for kids, and each year, tens of thousands are severely injured or even killed in ATV accidents,” said Ms. Anderson. “We can head off this expensive, unnecessary tragedy by Congress adopting common sense safety standards that keep children under 16 off these powerful vehicles and require teenagers have a license to ride one, just like we do for cars.  We urge members of the Senate Commerce Committee to pass legislation that embraces these sound solutions.”

“Our new web site (http://www.atvsafetynet.org) provides families with information to make informed decisions about their children's safety, offer support to victims and reinforces the case made by America’s doctors that ATVs are simply too dangerous for children under 16,” said Ms. Rabe. “There’s really no reason to avoid common sense, low-cost steps that will help prevent other families from having to suffer through the loss of a child.”

Text of the letter:

Dear Senate Commerce Committee member:

Our names are Carolyn Anderson and Sue Rabe and we are co-founders of Concerned Families for ATV Safety (www.atvsafetynet.org).

Our organization is a network of parents dedicated to reducing injuries and deaths among children driving All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs). We provide families with information to make informed decisions about their children's safety, and to raise awareness of the need for adequate, common sense safety standards and enforcement of ATV laws.

ATVs are important to many lifestyles, both for recreation and work.  But each year, over 40,000 American children are seriously injured or killed riding ATVs. On April 2nd, a 14-month old child was killed on an ATV in South Carolina.

Leading medical experts say children have not developed the strength, coordination or judgment needed to safely handle these powerful vehicles, which pose a greater threat to children than many other types of recreation, such as riding a bike, playing football or skateboarding among others. This growing problem devastates families and costs our nation billions of dollars in unnecessary medical and financial costs and emotional trauma.  

We can reduce and prevent the number of injuries and deaths among children from ATV accidents by adopting common sense safety standards recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics – standards that keep children under 16 off these vehicles and require teenagers to have a license to drive ATVs, just as we do for cars. 

To that end, I know that the Consumer Affairs, Insurance, and Automotive Safety subcommittee of the Senate Commerce Committee will be holding a hearing on May 9th on the topic of ATV Safety. As a member of this committee, I am hoping that you could address the following questions concerning the use of ATVs by children.  We will be following up with a phone call and will post answers to these questions on our organization’s website, www.atvsafetynet.org.

  1. How young is too young to ride an ATV?
  1. Would you put your child or grandchild on an ATV?
  1. Pediatricians and top medical organizations have given unequivocal warnings against children driving ATVs. If you disagree with them, why?
  1. Some ATV manufacturers endorse a ban on child drivers under the age of 16 for personal watercrafts, such as jet skies. Why are personal watercrafts more dangerous for young children than powerful ATVs?

Currently, the Consumer Product Safety Commission’s limited resources constrain its ability to pursue common sense ATVs standards.  The only effective response to this national tragedy is a Congressional inquiry into the dangers these vehicles, with an eye toward banning their sale and use by children under 16. 

We can put a stop to these expensive, unnecessary tragedies by enacting common-sense safety standards.  I hope you will join me in this important effort.  For more information about our campaign, I invite you to contact me or to visit our web site at www.atvsafetynet.org

We appreciate you taking time to review this letter and look forward to your response.

Sincerely,

Carolyn Anderson                                                Sue Rabe
Brockton, MA                                                      Turner, Oregon

 

-30-

Concerned Parents for ATV Safety is a network of parents dedicated to reducing injuries and death among children driving powerful All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs). We offer support to victim’s families and provide families with information and resources to make informed decisions about their children and ATVs. Through public education we work to raise awareness of the need for adequate, common sense safety standards that keep children under 16 off ATVs, and for enforcement of ATV laws

 

 



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 04, 2013

Deaths and Injuries to Children Under 16 Still Very Alarming

Statement of Concerned families for ATV Safety Upon the Release of CPSC’s 2011 ATV Death and Injury Data

Turner, Oregon – With the release today of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission’s (CPSC)  2011 ATV Report, we are very concerned about the percentage of deaths and injuries of children. We are concerned about both those deaths and injuries suffered by children under the age of 16 and those suffered by children under the age of 12 years old.  This has become a very serious trend that must be addressed immediately.

While the report shows that 57 children under the age of 16 lost their lives due to an ATV crash in 2011 compared to 82 children in 2010, it is important to note that these totals are not complete and are added throughout the year.  The very alarming fact to Concerned Families for ATV Safety is that 47% of these deaths were of children under the age of 12. 
CPSC estimates 29,000 children under the age of 16 were injured in 2011 compared to 28,300 in 2010.  This constitutes an increase in which 15,100 (52%), of those children were under the age of 12 years old.

Concerned Families for ATV Safety’s analysis of today’s data finds that although the number of deaths to children may have slightly decreased for now, the percentage of the total ATV deaths to children has increased compared to 2009 and 2010.   Furthermore, the number of injuries to children has already exceeded those of 2010.  This problem will continue until there are stricter enforcements in place that will keep children off of ATV's. 

The weight and stability of all ATV's must be studied more closely. We continue to see children die or become severely injured from ATV's, and that is something which we can stop if people realize that ATV's are not meant for children.  They are not a sport that children should be participating in and they are not toys.  ATV's are motorized vehicles and should be treated as such.  The numbers in the 2011 ATV report show far too many needless and preventable deaths, especially to children. 

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 01, 2010

Recent ATV Injury and Death Data from U.S. CPSC Doesn’t Tell the Full Story

Statement of Concerned Families for ATV Safety

The recently released ATV death and injury data from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) does not appear to be telling the full story when it comes to the impact of ATV death and injuries. While we read the recent release of the ATV Death and Injuries reported by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, we were alarmed because one would think that ATV deaths and Injuries have significantly decreased for children under 16 years of age.  However, what has failed to be highlighted is the fact that they the CPSC has just started compiling this data differently.  Some of the incidents that used to be included in this report have been moved to another report.  Recreational off highway vehicles, such as the Yamaha Rhino, which have been the cause of many deaths this past year, are now in its own category, not in its usual category with ATV’s as it has been in prior years.  While it looks very promising that ATV deaths are on the decline, it is truly a much smaller decline then is actually the case. This is important because we have a lot of work to do to prevent Deaths and injuries caused by ATVS and while the data does indicate a small decline, it doesn’t mean we can stop working to protect children from the hazards posed by ATVs.
ATV’s are still killing and injuring thousands of people each year and a good part of them are children under the age of 16.  We at Concerned Families for ATV Safety try to keep track of deaths that occur to children under 16.  Our calculations were higher than those from CPSC’s data even when we subtracted the known deaths from ROHVs or UTVs, (the machines that are no longer listed in this report).   Unfortunately, we don’t believe that the actual decrease of deaths to children under the age of 16 is in any way statistically significant.

CPSC is responsible for overseeing these products that are killing and injuring more people than any other product they oversee.  We are hopeful that with new laws, more extensive public education and a new administration that we can change these numbers to where they really count.  There are still too many children that are becoming victims to these machines that they should never be on in the first place.

Here is a link to the most recent ATV Death and Injury Data from CPSC:  http://www.cpsc.gov/library/foia/foia10/os/atv2008.pdf

Here is a link to Concerned Families for ATV Safety’s web site: www.atvsafetynet.org

- ### -

Concerned Families for ATV Safety is dedicated to reducing injuries and deaths among children driving/riding powerful All Terrain Vehicles.  www.atvsafetynet.org

 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 18, 2007

Concerned Families Releases New Study on Child ATV and Bicycle Injuries Showing Skyrocketing Hospitalization Rates and Medical Costs

ATV-Related Medical Costs in Children Rise nearly 200% in 5 Years, Hospitalization Rate Increases Nearly 70%, Confirming Industry’s Voluntary Standards Do Not Work

WASHINGTON, DC – Concerned Families for ATV Safety (http://www.atvsafetynet.org) today released the results of a new health costs study, “Death and Injury Resulting from ATV and Bicycle Crashes: a 5-Year Comparison of National Prevalence and Cost Estimates among Children and Adults” that shows skyrocketing hospitalization rates and medical costs from child ATV accidents from 2000 to 2004. The study was conducted by Dr. Jim Helmkamp, PhD, MS, FACE (West Virginia University).

The U.S. ATV industry is currently pushing a proposal in Congress introduced by Senator Ted Stevens (AK) that would make the current voluntary industry safety standards mandatory for all ATV manufacturers, including those made overseas in China. However, as the data from this study indicates, this approach – voluntary or not – simply has not protected our children.

Key Findings

The National Sporting Goods Association estimates that 14.2 million children ages 7 to 17 ride bicycles in the United States, while the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) says there are about 2.2 million ATV riders under the age of 16. Even though roughly seven times as many children ride bikes:

Hospitalization Rate & Number of Injuries

The hospitalization rate for children under 16 in ATV accidents increased 67% from 2000 to 2004, while the hospitalization rate for children in bicycle accidents decreased 12%.

• Similarly, the number of children sent to the hospital because of an ATV accident increased 70% during this same time period, while the number of children sent to the hospital because of a bicycle accident went down 12%.

Medical Costs

The medical costs associated with child ATV accidents increased 196% over the five year period to $71 million in 2004, while the medical costs for child bicycle accidents went up 32% to $92 million in 2004.

The average cost of a child being sent to the hospital from an ATV accident is 44% higher than for bicycles - $19,706 in 2004 for ATVs compared to $13,713 for bicycles.

Additional data compiled and analyzed by Dr. Helmkamp determined the following:

• In the United States, it is estimated that among children (15 and under) 6 were admitted to hospitals each day in 2000 for ATV-related injuries increasing to 10 per day in 2004.

• Among adults (16 or older) these figures were 17 per day in 2000 and 32 per day in 2004.

Preliminary Findings

Preliminary findings from the study, which were released in July, included the following:

• From 2000-2004, an average of 171 children under 16 died annually in ATV crashes compared to 157 from bicycle crashes. During this 5-year period:

• The number of deaths and death rate for child ATV riders increased 24%, while the number of child bicycle deaths declined 18% and the death rate decreased 17%.

• Meanwhile, the total economic costs related to the youthful ATV deaths increased 45% over the 5-year period (from $673 million to $973 million) while costs decreased 5% for the young bicycle riders ($776 million to $738 million).

“There’s really no reason to avoid common sense, low-cost steps to reduce and prevent the number of injuries and deaths among kids from ATV accidents,” said Sue Rabe, co-founder of Concerned Families for ATV Safety. “Our organization believes Congress needs to conduct a thorough investigation into the full costs of child ATV accidents with an eye toward passing the recommended safety standards of the American Academy of Pediatrics – standards that keep children under 16 off these powerful vehicles which can weigh up to a 1,000 pounds and travel at speeds in excess of 70 mph. Congress has the power to reign in the costs to society associated with these unnecessary and preventable tragedies.”

“This new study puts to rest several false claims made the ATV industry,” said Carolyn Anderson, co-founder of Concerned Families for ATV Safety. “First, some claim that when someone else’s child gets killed on an ATV, it is solely their problem, but the findings our study show that these accidents do come at great costs to all of us.”

“Second, the ATV industry argues that the number of child deaths increases each year because ridership keeps going up, but once again, the findings in this study show this not to be true. In fact, the death rate is increasing at a disproportionately high rate. And third, the U.S. ATV industry wants to make the current voluntary standards mandatory because they argue that unsafe Chinese models are flooding the U.S. market and are the main reason for child deaths and serious injuries from ATV accidents. If the industry has evidence to back up this claim, they should let us see it. The truth is that since 2000, 97% of ATV recalls came from the same companies that are complaining about Chinese imports,” continued Ms. Anderson.

This study was funded by the Arabella Legacy Fund, a private charitable organization that also supports the work of Concerned Families for ATV Safety. It was prepared by Dr. Jim Helmkamp, PhD, MS, FACE (West Virginia University).

Attached are several charts illustrating the key findings of the study.

- 30 -

Concerned Parents for ATV Safety is a network of parents dedicated to reducing injuries and death among children driving powerful All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs). We offer support to victims' families and provide families with information and resources to make informed decisions about their children and ATVs. Through public education we work to raise awareness of the need for adequate, common sense safety standards that keep children under 16 off ATVs, and for enforcement of ATV laws.



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Concerned Families for ATV Safety Releases New Health Cost Study on Child ATV and Bicycle Fatalities Showing Industry's Voluntary Standards Do Not Work

Preliminary Findings Indicate ATV Child Dangers on the Rise, Refute Premise of New Legislation Proposed by Sen. Ted Stevens to Make Industry Voluntary Standards Mandatory

WASHINGTON, DC –

Concerned Families for ATV Safety today released the preliminary findings of a new health costs study (http://www.atvsafetynet.org/parents.php?page=compare) that clearly shows the ATV industry's voluntary safety standards do not work. The study, which compares trends and financial costs to society of child ATV and bicycle fatalities between 2000 and 2004, shows a significant increase in child ATV deaths and death rate, as well as medical costs and overall economic costs related to these deaths, while child bike deaths and related costs have declined.

The U.S. ATV industry is current pushing a proposal in Congress recently introduced by Senator Ted Stevens (AK) that would make the current voluntary industry safety standards mandatory for all ATV manufacturers, including those made overseas in China. However, at the data from this study indicates, this approach - voluntary or not - simply has not protected our children.

Key Findings

From 2000-2004, an average of 171 children under 16 died annually in ATV crashes compared to 157 from bicycle crashes. During this 5-year period:

The number of deaths and death rate for child ATV riders increased 24%, while the number of child bicycle deaths declined 18% and the death rate decreased 17%.

Meanwhile, the total economic costs related to the youthful ATV deaths increased 45% over the 5-year period (from $673 million to $973 million) while costs decreased 5% for the young bicycle riders ($776 million to $738 million).

Medical costs related to child ATV deaths increased nearly 70% while medical costs related to child bicycle deaths decreased 20%.

Quality of life costs related to child ATV deaths increased by 44% while quality of life costs related to child bicycle deaths decreased by 4%.

Costs due to work loss from child ATV deaths increased by 46% while work loss costs related to child bicycle deaths decreased by approximately 6%.

"There's really no reason to avoid common sense, low-cost steps to reduce and prevent the number of injuries and deaths among kids from ATV accidents," said Sue Rabe, co-founder of Concerned Families for ATV Safety. "Our organization believes Congress needs to conduct a thorough investigation into the full costs of child ATV accidents with an eye toward passing the recommended safety standards of the American Academy of Pediatrics - standards that keep children under 16 off these powerful vehicles."

"This new study puts to rest several false claims made the ATV industry," said Carolyn Anderson, co-founder of Concerned Families for ATV Safety. "First, some claim that when someone else’s child gets killed on an ATV, it is solely their problem, but the findings our study show that these accidents do come at great costs to all of us."

"Second, the ATV industry argues that the number of child deaths increases each year because ridership keeps going up, but once again, the findings in this study show this not to be true. In fact, the death rate is increasing at a disproportionately high rate. And third, the U.S. ATV industry wants to make the current voluntary standards mandatory because they argue that unsafe Chinese models are flooding the U.S. market and are the main reason for child deaths and serious injuries from ATV accidents. If the industry has evidence to back up this claim, they should let us see it. The truth is that since 2000, 97% of ATV recalls came from the same companies that are complaining about Chinese imports," continued Ms. Anderson.

This study was funded by the Arabella Legacy Fund, a private charitable organization that also supports the work of Concerned Families for ATV Safety. It was prepared by Dr. Jim Helmkamp, PhD, MS, FACE.

To view the findings of the study, please visit: http://www.atvsafetynet.org/parents.php?page=compare

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Concerned Parents for ATV Safety is a network of parents dedicated to reducing injuries and death among children driving powerful All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs). We offer support to victims' families and provide families with information and resources to make informed decisions about their children and ATVs. Through public education we work to raise awareness of the need for adequate, common sense safety standards that keep children under 16 off ATVs, and for enforcement of ATV laws.



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 9, 2007

Concerned Families for ATV Safety Releases Web Video Highlighting Need for Common Sense Safety Standards

Video Questions Industry Lobbyist's "Outrageous and Irresponsible" Comments About ATV Age Limits

WASHINGTON, DC – Concerned Families for ATV Safety today released a new web video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=czqg-03M7L0) about last week's Senate Commerce Committee hearing on ATV Safety, highlighting the urgent need for common sense safety standards to keep children under 16 off powerful and deadly ATVs. The video raises serious questions about comments made by ATV Industry attorney David Murray regarding ATV age limits during the hearing.

In response to a question posed Sen. Mark Pryor (D-AR), Chair of the Consumer Affairs, Insurance, and Automotive Safety subcommittee about what age is too young to ride an ATV, Mr. Murray said, "[the industry's] voluntary standard specifies that the smallest units -- the Y-6 units -- are for ages 6 and above." Mr. Murray made this comment despite broad support from pediatricians and the medical community that because children under 16 do not have the physical and mental capacity to ride an ATVs safely, they should be kept off these powerful vehicles.

"Mr. Murray's comments that it's ok to put a 6-year-old behind the wheels of a powerful, 100-pound All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) -- that causes of tens of thousands of serious injuries and deaths each year among children -- are simply outrageous and irresponsible," said Carolyn Anderson, Concerned Families for ATV Safety Co-Founder. Instead of marketing these dangerous vehicles to children, the ATV industry ought to adopt the common sense safety standards recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics -- standards that keep children under 16 off these vehicles and require teenagers to have a license to drive ATVs, just as we do for cars."

"Perhaps Mr. Murray knows something that pediatricians don't know, but we know that the industry he represents is making a product that costs our country billions each year in medical and economic costs," said Sue Rabe, Concerned Families for ATV Safety Co-Founder. "Congress has the power to reign in these costs and protect children. Congress needs to act now."

To view the video, please visit http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=czqg-03M7L0 .

-30-

Concerned Parents for ATV Safety is a network of parents dedicated to reducing injuries and death among children driving powerful All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs). We offer support to victim's families and provide families with information and resources to make informed decisions about their children and ATVs. Through public education we work to raise awareness of the need for adequate, common sense safety standards that keep children under 16 off ATVs, and for enforcement of ATV laws. For more information, please visit our web site at atvsafetynet.org.



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 9, 2007

Concerned Families for ATV Safety Calls on Senate Commerce Committee to Pass Common Sense Safety Standards That Keep Children under 16 off ATVs

Launches New Web Site with Facts about why ATVs and Children Don’t Mix

WASHINGTON, DC – Concerned Families for ATV Safety today called on members of the Senate Commerce Committee to address the growing problem of child injuries and deaths caused by All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) accidents. To coincide with today’s Consumer Affairs, Insurance, and Automotive Safety subcommittee hearing on this topic, the organization’s co-founders, Carolyn Anderson and Sue Rabe sent a letter (see below) to all subcommittee members surveying their views on the issue, and urging them to adopt common sense safety standards recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics – standards that keep children under 16 off these vehicles and require teenagers to have a license to drive ATVs, just as we do for cars. 

Additionally, Concerned Families launched a new web site today (www.atvsafetynet.org), featuring key facts about why ATVs and children don’t mix, resources for parents to make informed decisions about their children’s safety, and an interactive map with a sampling of reported child ATV deaths for 2007 and previous years.

In 2005, Ms. Anderson of Brockton, Massachusetts and Ms. Rabe or Turner, Oregon, along with Carol Keezer of Defiance, Ohio, founded Concerned Families for ATV Safety after each of their children had been killed driving ATVs.  They were brought together by shared grief and decided to create the organization as a way to offer support to victim’s families and raise awareness of the need for adequate, common sense safety standards that keep children under age 16 off ATVs, and for enforcement of existing ATV laws. 

“ATVs are important to many lifestyles, but pediatricians say they’re unsafe for kids, and each year, tens of thousands are severely injured or even killed in ATV accidents,” said Ms. Anderson. “We can head off this expensive, unnecessary tragedy by Congress adopting common sense safety standards that keep children under 16 off these powerful vehicles and require teenagers have a license to ride one, just like we do for cars.  We urge members of the Senate Commerce Committee to pass legislation that embraces these sound solutions.”

“Our new web site (http://www.atvsafetynet.org) provides families with information to make informed decisions about their children's safety, offer support to victims and reinforces the case made by America’s doctors that ATVs are simply too dangerous for children under 16,” said Ms. Rabe. “There’s really no reason to avoid common sense, low-cost steps that will help prevent other families from having to suffer through the loss of a child.”

Text of the letter:

Dear Senate Commerce Committee member:

Our names are Carolyn Anderson and Sue Rabe and we are co-founders of Concerned Families for ATV Safety (www.atvsafetynet.org).

Our organization is a network of parents dedicated to reducing injuries and deaths among children driving All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs). We provide families with information to make informed decisions about their children's safety, and to raise awareness of the need for adequate, common sense safety standards and enforcement of ATV laws.

ATVs are important to many lifestyles, both for recreation and work.  But each year, over 40,000 American children are seriously injured or killed riding ATVs. On April 2nd, a 14-month old child was killed on an ATV in South Carolina.

Leading medical experts say children have not developed the strength, coordination or judgment needed to safely handle these powerful vehicles, which pose a greater threat to children than many other types of recreation, such as riding a bike, playing football or skateboarding among others. This growing problem devastates families and costs our nation billions of dollars in unnecessary medical and financial costs and emotional trauma.  

We can reduce and prevent the number of injuries and deaths among children from ATV accidents by adopting common sense safety standards recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics – standards that keep children under 16 off these vehicles and require teenagers to have a license to drive ATVs, just as we do for cars. 

To that end, I know that the Consumer Affairs, Insurance, and Automotive Safety subcommittee of the Senate Commerce Committee will be holding a hearing on May 9th on the topic of ATV Safety. As a member of this committee, I am hoping that you could address the following questions concerning the use of ATVs by children.  We will be following up with a phone call and will post answers to these questions on our organization’s website, www.atvsafetynet.org.

  1. How young is too young to ride an ATV?
  1. Would you put your child or grandchild on an ATV?
  1. Pediatricians and top medical organizations have given unequivocal warnings against children driving ATVs. If you disagree with them, why?
  1. Some ATV manufacturers endorse a ban on child drivers under the age of 16 for personal watercrafts, such as jet skies. Why are personal watercrafts more dangerous for young children than powerful ATVs?

Currently, the Consumer Product Safety Commission’s limited resources constrain its ability to pursue common sense ATVs standards.  The only effective response to this national tragedy is a Congressional inquiry into the dangers these vehicles, with an eye toward banning their sale and use by children under 16. 

We can put a stop to these expensive, unnecessary tragedies by enacting common-sense safety standards.  I hope you will join me in this important effort.  For more information about our campaign, I invite you to contact me or to visit our web site at www.atvsafetynet.org

We appreciate you taking time to review this letter and look forward to your response.

Sincerely,

Carolyn Anderson                                                Sue Rabe
Brockton, MA                                                      Turner, Oregon

 

-30-

Concerned Parents for ATV Safety is a network of parents dedicated to reducing injuries and death among children driving powerful All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs). We offer support to victim’s families and provide families with information and resources to make informed decisions about their children and ATVs. Through public education we work to raise awareness of the need for adequate, common sense safety standards that keep children under 16 off ATVs, and for enforcement of ATV laws

 

 



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 04, 2013

Deaths and Injuries to Children Under 16 Still Very Alarming

Statement of Concerned families for ATV Safety Upon the Release of CPSC’s 2011 ATV Death and Injury Data

Turner, Oregon – With the release today of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission’s (CPSC)  2011 ATV Report, we are very concerned about the percentage of deaths and injuries of children. We are concerned about both those deaths and injuries suffered by children under the age of 16 and those suffered by children under the age of 12 years old.  This has become a very serious trend that must be addressed immediately.

While the report shows that 57 children under the age of 16 lost their lives due to an ATV crash in 2011 compared to 82 children in 2010, it is important to note that these totals are not complete and are added throughout the year.  The very alarming fact to Concerned Families for ATV Safety is that 47% of these deaths were of children under the age of 12. 
CPSC estimates 29,000 children under the age of 16 were injured in 2011 compared to 28,300 in 2010.  This constitutes an increase in which 15,100 (52%), of those children were under the age of 12 years old.

Concerned Families for ATV Safety’s analysis of today’s data finds that although the number of deaths to children may have slightly decreased for now, the percentage of the total ATV deaths to children has increased compared to 2009 and 2010.   Furthermore, the number of injuries to children has already exceeded those of 2010.  This problem will continue until there are stricter enforcements in place that will keep children off of ATV's. 

The weight and stability of all ATV's must be studied more closely. We continue to see children die or become severely injured from ATV's, and that is something which we can stop if people realize that ATV's are not meant for children.  They are not a sport that children should be participating in and they are not toys.  ATV's are motorized vehicles and should be treated as such.  The numbers in the 2011 ATV report show far too many needless and preventable deaths, especially to children. 

- ### -

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 01, 2010

Recent ATV Injury and Death Data from U.S. CPSC Doesn’t Tell the Full Story

Statement of Concerned Families for ATV Safety

The recently released ATV death and injury data from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) does not appear to be telling the full story when it comes to the impact of ATV death and injuries. While we read the recent release of the ATV Death and Injuries reported by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, we were alarmed because one would think that ATV deaths and Injuries have significantly decreased for children under 16 years of age.  However, what has failed to be highlighted is the fact that they the CPSC has just started compiling this data differently.  Some of the incidents that used to be included in this report have been moved to another report.  Recreational off highway vehicles, such as the Yamaha Rhino, which have been the cause of many deaths this past year, are now in its own category, not in its usual category with ATV’s as it has been in prior years.  While it looks very promising that ATV deaths are on the decline, it is truly a much smaller decline then is actually the case. This is important because we have a lot of work to do to prevent Deaths and injuries caused by ATVS and while the data does indicate a small decline, it doesn’t mean we can stop working to protect children from the hazards posed by ATVs.
ATV’s are still killing and injuring thousands of people each year and a good part of them are children under the age of 16.  We at Concerned Families for ATV Safety try to keep track of deaths that occur to children under 16.  Our calculations were higher than those from CPSC’s data even when we subtracted the known deaths from ROHVs or UTVs, (the machines that are no longer listed in this report).   Unfortunately, we don’t believe that the actual decrease of deaths to children under the age of 16 is in any way statistically significant.

CPSC is responsible for overseeing these products that are killing and injuring more people than any other product they oversee.  We are hopeful that with new laws, more extensive public education and a new administration that we can change these numbers to where they really count.  There are still too many children that are becoming victims to these machines that they should never be on in the first place.

Here is a link to the most recent ATV Death and Injury Data from CPSC:  http://www.cpsc.gov/library/foia/foia10/os/atv2008.pdf

Here is a link to Concerned Families for ATV Safety’s web site: www.atvsafetynet.org

- ### -

Concerned Families for ATV Safety is dedicated to reducing injuries and deaths among children driving/riding powerful All Terrain Vehicles.  www.atvsafetynet.org

 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 18, 2007

Concerned Families Releases New Study on Child ATV and Bicycle Injuries Showing Skyrocketing Hospitalization Rates and Medical Costs

ATV-Related Medical Costs in Children Rise nearly 200% in 5 Years, Hospitalization Rate Increases Nearly 70%, Confirming Industry’s Voluntary Standards Do Not Work

WASHINGTON, DC – Concerned Families for ATV Safety (http://www.atvsafetynet.org) today released the results of a new health costs study, “Death and Injury Resulting from ATV and Bicycle Crashes: a 5-Year Comparison of National Prevalence and Cost Estimates among Children and Adults” that shows skyrocketing hospitalization rates and medical costs from child ATV accidents from 2000 to 2004. The study was conducted by Dr. Jim Helmkamp, PhD, MS, FACE (West Virginia University).

The U.S. ATV industry is currently pushing a proposal in Congress introduced by Senator Ted Stevens (AK) that would make the current voluntary industry safety standards mandatory for all ATV manufacturers, including those made overseas in China. However, as the data from this study indicates, this approach – voluntary or not – simply has not protected our children.

Key Findings

The National Sporting Goods Association estimates that 14.2 million children ages 7 to 17 ride bicycles in the United States, while the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) says there are about 2.2 million ATV riders under the age of 16. Even though roughly seven times as many children ride bikes:

Hospitalization Rate & Number of Injuries

The hospitalization rate for children under 16 in ATV accidents increased 67% from 2000 to 2004, while the hospitalization rate for children in bicycle accidents decreased 12%.

• Similarly, the number of children sent to the hospital because of an ATV accident increased 70% during this same time period, while the number of children sent to the hospital because of a bicycle accident went down 12%.

Medical Costs

The medical costs associated with child ATV accidents increased 196% over the five year period to $71 million in 2004, while the medical costs for child bicycle accidents went up 32% to $92 million in 2004.

The average cost of a child being sent to the hospital from an ATV accident is 44% higher than for bicycles - $19,706 in 2004 for ATVs compared to $13,713 for bicycles.

Additional data compiled and analyzed by Dr. Helmkamp determined the following:

• In the United States, it is estimated that among children (15 and under) 6 were admitted to hospitals each day in 2000 for ATV-related injuries increasing to 10 per day in 2004.

• Among adults (16 or older) these figures were 17 per day in 2000 and 32 per day in 2004.

Preliminary Findings

Preliminary findings from the study, which were released in July, included the following:

• From 2000-2004, an average of 171 children under 16 died annually in ATV crashes compared to 157 from bicycle crashes. During this 5-year period:

• The number of deaths and death rate for child ATV riders increased 24%, while the number of child bicycle deaths declined 18% and the death rate decreased 17%.

• Meanwhile, the total economic costs related to the youthful ATV deaths increased 45% over the 5-year period (from $673 million to $973 million) while costs decreased 5% for the young bicycle riders ($776 million to $738 million).

“There’s really no reason to avoid common sense, low-cost steps to reduce and prevent the number of injuries and deaths among kids from ATV accidents,” said Sue Rabe, co-founder of Concerned Families for ATV Safety. “Our organization believes Congress needs to conduct a thorough investigation into the full costs of child ATV accidents with an eye toward passing the recommended safety standards of the American Academy of Pediatrics – standards that keep children under 16 off these powerful vehicles which can weigh up to a 1,000 pounds and travel at speeds in excess of 70 mph. Congress has the power to reign in the costs to society associated with these unnecessary and preventable tragedies.”

“This new study puts to rest several false claims made the ATV industry,” said Carolyn Anderson, co-founder of Concerned Families for ATV Safety. “First, some claim that when someone else’s child gets killed on an ATV, it is solely their problem, but the findings our study show that these accidents do come at great costs to all of us.”

“Second, the ATV industry argues that the number of child deaths increases each year because ridership keeps going up, but once again, the findings in this study show this not to be true. In fact, the death rate is increasing at a disproportionately high rate. And third, the U.S. ATV industry wants to make the current voluntary standards mandatory because they argue that unsafe Chinese models are flooding the U.S. market and are the main reason for child deaths and serious injuries from ATV accidents. If the industry has evidence to back up this claim, they should let us see it. The truth is that since 2000, 97% of ATV recalls came from the same companies that are complaining about Chinese imports,” continued Ms. Anderson.

This study was funded by the Arabella Legacy Fund, a private charitable organization that also supports the work of Concerned Families for ATV Safety. It was prepared by Dr. Jim Helmkamp, PhD, MS, FACE (West Virginia University).

Attached are several charts illustrating the key findings of the study.

- 30 -

Concerned Parents for ATV Safety is a network of parents dedicated to reducing injuries and death among children driving powerful All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs). We offer support to victims' families and provide families with information and resources to make informed decisions about their children and ATVs. Through public education we work to raise awareness of the need for adequate, common sense safety standards that keep children under 16 off ATVs, and for enforcement of ATV laws.



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Concerned Families for ATV Safety Releases New Health Cost Study on Child ATV and Bicycle Fatalities Showing Industry's Voluntary Standards Do Not Work

Preliminary Findings Indicate ATV Child Dangers on the Rise, Refute Premise of New Legislation Proposed by Sen. Ted Stevens to Make Industry Voluntary Standards Mandatory

WASHINGTON, DC –

Concerned Families for ATV Safety today released the preliminary findings of a new health costs study (http://www.atvsafetynet.org/parents.php?page=compare) that clearly shows the ATV industry's voluntary safety standards do not work. The study, which compares trends and financial costs to society of child ATV and bicycle fatalities between 2000 and 2004, shows a significant increase in child ATV deaths and death rate, as well as medical costs and overall economic costs related to these deaths, while child bike deaths and related costs have declined.

The U.S. ATV industry is current pushing a proposal in Congress recently introduced by Senator Ted Stevens (AK) that would make the current voluntary industry safety standards mandatory for all ATV manufacturers, including those made overseas in China. However, at the data from this study indicates, this approach - voluntary or not - simply has not protected our children.

Key Findings

From 2000-2004, an average of 171 children under 16 died annually in ATV crashes compared to 157 from bicycle crashes. During this 5-year period:

The number of deaths and death rate for child ATV riders increased 24%, while the number of child bicycle deaths declined 18% and the death rate decreased 17%.

Meanwhile, the total economic costs related to the youthful ATV deaths increased 45% over the 5-year period (from $673 million to $973 million) while costs decreased 5% for the young bicycle riders ($776 million to $738 million).

Medical costs related to child ATV deaths increased nearly 70% while medical costs related to child bicycle deaths decreased 20%.

Quality of life costs related to child ATV deaths increased by 44% while quality of life costs related to child bicycle deaths decreased by 4%.

Costs due to work loss from child ATV deaths increased by 46% while work loss costs related to child bicycle deaths decreased by approximately 6%.

"There's really no reason to avoid common sense, low-cost steps to reduce and prevent the number of injuries and deaths among kids from ATV accidents," said Sue Rabe, co-founder of Concerned Families for ATV Safety. "Our organization believes Congress needs to conduct a thorough investigation into the full costs of child ATV accidents with an eye toward passing the recommended safety standards of the American Academy of Pediatrics - standards that keep children under 16 off these powerful vehicles."

"This new study puts to rest several false claims made the ATV industry," said Carolyn Anderson, co-founder of Concerned Families for ATV Safety. "First, some claim that when someone else’s child gets killed on an ATV, it is solely their problem, but the findings our study show that these accidents do come at great costs to all of us."

"Second, the ATV industry argues that the number of child deaths increases each year because ridership keeps going up, but once again, the findings in this study show this not to be true. In fact, the death rate is increasing at a disproportionately high rate. And third, the U.S. ATV industry wants to make the current voluntary standards mandatory because they argue that unsafe Chinese models are flooding the U.S. market and are the main reason for child deaths and serious injuries from ATV accidents. If the industry has evidence to back up this claim, they should let us see it. The truth is that since 2000, 97% of ATV recalls came from the same companies that are complaining about Chinese imports," continued Ms. Anderson.

This study was funded by the Arabella Legacy Fund, a private charitable organization that also supports the work of Concerned Families for ATV Safety. It was prepared by Dr. Jim Helmkamp, PhD, MS, FACE.

To view the findings of the study, please visit: http://www.atvsafetynet.org/parents.php?page=compare

- 30 -

Concerned Parents for ATV Safety is a network of parents dedicated to reducing injuries and death among children driving powerful All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs). We offer support to victims' families and provide families with information and resources to make informed decisions about their children and ATVs. Through public education we work to raise awareness of the need for adequate, common sense safety standards that keep children under 16 off ATVs, and for enforcement of ATV laws.



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 9, 2007

Concerned Families for ATV Safety Releases Web Video Highlighting Need for Common Sense Safety Standards

Video Questions Industry Lobbyist's "Outrageous and Irresponsible" Comments About ATV Age Limits

WASHINGTON, DC – Concerned Families for ATV Safety today released a new web video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=czqg-03M7L0) about last week's Senate Commerce Committee hearing on ATV Safety, highlighting the urgent need for common sense safety standards to keep children under 16 off powerful and deadly ATVs. The video raises serious questions about comments made by ATV Industry attorney David Murray regarding ATV age limits during the hearing.

In response to a question posed Sen. Mark Pryor (D-AR), Chair of the Consumer Affairs, Insurance, and Automotive Safety subcommittee about what age is too young to ride an ATV, Mr. Murray said, "[the industry's] voluntary standard specifies that the smallest units -- the Y-6 units -- are for ages 6 and above." Mr. Murray made this comment despite broad support from pediatricians and the medical community that because children under 16 do not have the physical and mental capacity to ride an ATVs safely, they should be kept off these powerful vehicles.

"Mr. Murray's comments that it's ok to put a 6-year-old behind the wheels of a powerful, 100-pound All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) -- that causes of tens of thousands of serious injuries and deaths each year among children -- are simply outrageous and irresponsible," said Carolyn Anderson, Concerned Families for ATV Safety Co-Founder. Instead of marketing these dangerous vehicles to children, the ATV industry ought to adopt the common sense safety standards recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics -- standards that keep children under 16 off these vehicles and require teenagers to have a license to drive ATVs, just as we do for cars."

"Perhaps Mr. Murray knows something that pediatricians don't know, but we know that the industry he represents is making a product that costs our country billions each year in medical and economic costs," said Sue Rabe, Concerned Families for ATV Safety Co-Founder. "Congress has the power to reign in these costs and protect children. Congress needs to act now."

To view the video, please visit http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=czqg-03M7L0 .

-30-

Concerned Parents for ATV Safety is a network of parents dedicated to reducing injuries and death among children driving powerful All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs). We offer support to victim's families and provide families with information and resources to make informed decisions about their children and ATVs. Through public education we work to raise awareness of the need for adequate, common sense safety standards that keep children under 16 off ATVs, and for enforcement of ATV laws. For more information, please visit our web site at atvsafetynet.org.



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 9, 2007

Concerned Families for ATV Safety Calls on Senate Commerce Committee to Pass Common Sense Safety Standards That Keep Children under 16 off ATVs

Launches New Web Site with Facts about why ATVs and Children Don’t Mix

WASHINGTON, DC – Concerned Families for ATV Safety today called on members of the Senate Commerce Committee to address the growing problem of child injuries and deaths caused by All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) accidents. To coincide with today’s Consumer Affairs, Insurance, and Automotive Safety subcommittee hearing on this topic, the organization’s co-founders, Carolyn Anderson and Sue Rabe sent a letter (see below) to all subcommittee members surveying their views on the issue, and urging them to adopt common sense safety standards recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics – standards that keep children under 16 off these vehicles and require teenagers to have a license to drive ATVs, just as we do for cars. 

Additionally, Concerned Families launched a new web site today (www.atvsafetynet.org), featuring key facts about why ATVs and children don’t mix, resources for parents to make informed decisions about their children’s safety, and an interactive map with a sampling of reported child ATV deaths for 2007 and previous years.

In 2005, Ms. Anderson of Brockton, Massachusetts and Ms. Rabe or Turner, Oregon, along with Carol Keezer of Defiance, Ohio, founded Concerned Families for ATV Safety after each of their children had been killed driving ATVs.  They were brought together by shared grief and decided to create the organization as a way to offer support to victim’s families and raise awareness of the need for adequate, common sense safety standards that keep children under age 16 off ATVs, and for enforcement of existing ATV laws. 

“ATVs are important to many lifestyles, but pediatricians say they’re unsafe for kids, and each year, tens of thousands are severely injured or even killed in ATV accidents,” said Ms. Anderson. “We can head off this expensive, unnecessary tragedy by Congress adopting common sense safety standards that keep children under 16 off these powerful vehicles and require teenagers have a license to ride one, just like we do for cars.  We urge members of the Senate Commerce Committee to pass legislation that embraces these sound solutions.”

“Our new web site (http://www.atvsafetynet.org) provides families with information to make informed decisions about their children's safety, offer support to victims and reinforces the case made by America’s doctors that ATVs are simply too dangerous for children under 16,” said Ms. Rabe. “There’s really no reason to avoid common sense, low-cost steps that will help prevent other families from having to suffer through the loss of a child.”

Text of the letter:

Dear Senate Commerce Committee member:

Our names are Carolyn Anderson and Sue Rabe and we are co-founders of Concerned Families for ATV Safety (www.atvsafetynet.org).

Our organization is a network of parents dedicated to reducing injuries and deaths among children driving All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs). We provide families with information to make informed decisions about their children's safety, and to raise awareness of the need for adequate, common sense safety standards and enforcement of ATV laws.

ATVs are important to many lifestyles, both for recreation and work.  But each year, over 40,000 American children are seriously injured or killed riding ATVs. On April 2nd, a 14-month old child was killed on an ATV in South Carolina.

Leading medical experts say children have not developed the strength, coordination or judgment needed to safely handle these powerful vehicles, which pose a greater threat to children than many other types of recreation, such as riding a bike, playing football or skateboarding among others. This growing problem devastates families and costs our nation billions of dollars in unnecessary medical and financial costs and emotional trauma.  

We can reduce and prevent the number of injuries and deaths among children from ATV accidents by adopting common sense safety standards recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics – standards that keep children under 16 off these vehicles and require teenagers to have a license to drive ATVs, just as we do for cars. 

To that end, I know that the Consumer Affairs, Insurance, and Automotive Safety subcommittee of the Senate Commerce Committee will be holding a hearing on May 9th on the topic of ATV Safety. As a member of this committee, I am hoping that you could address the following questions concerning the use of ATVs by children.  We will be following up with a phone call and will post answers to these questions on our organization’s website, www.atvsafetynet.org.

  1. How young is too young to ride an ATV?
  1. Would you put your child or grandchild on an ATV?
  1. Pediatricians and top medical organizations have given unequivocal warnings against children driving ATVs. If you disagree with them, why?
  1. Some ATV manufacturers endorse a ban on child drivers under the age of 16 for personal watercrafts, such as jet skies. Why are personal watercrafts more dangerous for young children than powerful ATVs?

Currently, the Consumer Product Safety Commission’s limited resources constrain its ability to pursue common sense ATVs standards.  The only effective response to this national tragedy is a Congressional inquiry into the dangers these vehicles, with an eye toward banning their sale and use by children under 16. 

We can put a stop to these expensive, unnecessary tragedies by enacting common-sense safety standards.  I hope you will join me in this important effort.  For more information about our campaign, I invite you to contact me or to visit our web site at www.atvsafetynet.org

We appreciate you taking time to review this letter and look forward to your response.

Sincerely,

Carolyn Anderson                                                Sue Rabe
Brockton, MA                                                      Turner, Oregon

 

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Concerned Parents for ATV Safety is a network of parents dedicated to reducing injuries and death among children driving powerful All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs). We offer support to victim’s families and provide families with information and resources to make informed decisions about their children and ATVs. Through public education we work to raise awareness of the need for adequate, common sense safety standards that keep children under 16 off ATVs, and for enforcement of ATV laws

 

 



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 04, 2013

Deaths and Injuries to Children Under 16 Still Very Alarming

Statement of Concerned families for ATV Safety Upon the Release of CPSC’s 2011 ATV Death and Injury Data

Turner, Oregon – With the release today of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission’s (CPSC)  2011 ATV Report, we are very concerned about the percentage of deaths and injuries of children. We are concerned about both those deaths and injuries suffered by children under the age of 16 and those suffered by children under the age of 12 years old.  This has become a very serious trend that must be addressed immediately.

While the report shows that 57 children under the age of 16 lost their lives due to an ATV crash in 2011 compared to 82 children in 2010, it is important to note that these totals are not complete and are added throughout the year.  The very alarming fact to Concerned Families for ATV Safety is that 47% of these deaths were of children under the age of 12. 
CPSC estimates 29,000 children under the age of 16 were injured in 2011 compared to 28,300 in 2010.  This constitutes an increase in which 15,100 (52%), of those children were under the age of 12 years old.

Concerned Families for ATV Safety’s analysis of today’s data finds that although the number of deaths to children may have slightly decreased for now, the percentage of the total ATV deaths to children has increased compared to 2009 and 2010.   Furthermore, the number of injuries to children has already exceeded those of 2010.  This problem will continue until there are stricter enforcements in place that will keep children off of ATV's. 

The weight and stability of all ATV's must be studied more closely. We continue to see children die or become severely injured from ATV's, and that is something which we can stop if people realize that ATV's are not meant for children.  They are not a sport that children should be participating in and they are not toys.  ATV's are motorized vehicles and should be treated as such.  The numbers in the 2011 ATV report show far too many needless and preventable deaths, especially to children. 

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 01, 2010

Recent ATV Injury and Death Data from U.S. CPSC Doesn’t Tell the Full Story

Statement of Concerned Families for ATV Safety

The recently released ATV death and injury data from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) does not appear to be telling the full story when it comes to the impact of ATV death and injuries. While we read the recent release of the ATV Death and Injuries reported by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, we were alarmed because one would think that ATV deaths and Injuries have significantly decreased for children under 16 years of age.  However, what has failed to be highlighted is the fact that they the CPSC has just started compiling this data differently.  Some of the incidents that used to be included in this report have been moved to another report.  Recreational off highway vehicles, such as the Yamaha Rhino, which have been the cause of many deaths this past year, are now in its own category, not in its usual category with ATV’s as it has been in prior years.  While it looks very promising that ATV deaths are on the decline, it is truly a much smaller decline then is actually the case. This is important because we have a lot of work to do to prevent Deaths and injuries caused by ATVS and while the data does indicate a small decline, it doesn’t mean we can stop working to protect children from the hazards posed by ATVs.
ATV’s are still killing and injuring thousands of people each year and a good part of them are children under the age of 16.  We at Concerned Families for ATV Safety try to keep track of deaths that occur to children under 16.  Our calculations were higher than those from CPSC’s data even when we subtracted the known deaths from ROHVs or UTVs, (the machines that are no longer listed in this report).   Unfortunately, we don’t believe that the actual decrease of deaths to children under the age of 16 is in any way statistically significant.

CPSC is responsible for overseeing these products that are killing and injuring more people than any other product they oversee.  We are hopeful that with new laws, more extensive public education and a new administration that we can change these numbers to where they really count.  There are still too many children that are becoming victims to these machines that they should never be on in the first place.

Here is a link to the most recent ATV Death and Injury Data from CPSC:  http://www.cpsc.gov/library/foia/foia10/os/atv2008.pdf

Here is a link to Concerned Families for ATV Safety’s web site: www.atvsafetynet.org

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Concerned Families for ATV Safety is dedicated to reducing injuries and deaths among children driving/riding powerful All Terrain Vehicles.  www.atvsafetynet.org

 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 18, 2007

Concerned Families Releases New Study on Child ATV and Bicycle Injuries Showing Skyrocketing Hospitalization Rates and Medical Costs

ATV-Related Medical Costs in Children Rise nearly 200% in 5 Years, Hospitalization Rate Increases Nearly 70%, Confirming Industry’s Voluntary Standards Do Not Work

WASHINGTON, DC – Concerned Families for ATV Safety (http://www.atvsafetynet.org) today released the results of a new health costs study, “Death and Injury Resulting from ATV and Bicycle Crashes: a 5-Year Comparison of National Prevalence and Cost Estimates among Children and Adults” that shows skyrocketing hospitalization rates and medical costs from child ATV accidents from 2000 to 2004. The study was conducted by Dr. Jim Helmkamp, PhD, MS, FACE (West Virginia University).

The U.S. ATV industry is currently pushing a proposal in Congress introduced by Senator Ted Stevens (AK) that would make the current voluntary industry safety standards mandatory for all ATV manufacturers, including those made overseas in China. However, as the data from this study indicates, this approach – voluntary or not – simply has not protected our children.

Key Findings

The National Sporting Goods Association estimates that 14.2 million children ages 7 to 17 ride bicycles in the United States, while the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) says there are about 2.2 million ATV riders under the age of 16. Even though roughly seven times as many children ride bikes:

Hospitalization Rate & Number of Injuries

The hospitalization rate for children under 16 in ATV accidents increased 67% from 2000 to 2004, while the hospitalization rate for children in bicycle accidents decreased 12%.

• Similarly, the number of children sent to the hospital because of an ATV accident increased 70% during this same time period, while the number of children sent to the hospital because of a bicycle accident went down 12%.

Medical Costs

The medical costs associated with child ATV accidents increased 196% over the five year period to $71 million in 2004, while the medical costs for child bicycle accidents went up 32% to $92 million in 2004.

The average cost of a child being sent to the hospital from an ATV accident is 44% higher than for bicycles - $19,706 in 2004 for ATVs compared to $13,713 for bicycles.

Additional data compiled and analyzed by Dr. Helmkamp determined the following:

• In the United States, it is estimated that among children (15 and under) 6 were admitted to hospitals each day in 2000 for ATV-related injuries increasing to 10 per day in 2004.

• Among adults (16 or older) these figures were 17 per day in 2000 and 32 per day in 2004.

Preliminary Findings

Preliminary findings from the study, which were released in July, included the following:

• From 2000-2004, an average of 171 children under 16 died annually in ATV crashes compared to 157 from bicycle crashes. During this 5-year period:

• The number of deaths and death rate for child ATV riders increased 24%, while the number of child bicycle deaths declined 18% and the death rate decreased 17%.

• Meanwhile, the total economic costs related to the youthful ATV deaths increased 45% over the 5-year period (from $673 million to $973 million) while costs decreased 5% for the young bicycle riders ($776 million to $738 million).

“There’s really no reason to avoid common sense, low-cost steps to reduce and prevent the number of injuries and deaths among kids from ATV accidents,” said Sue Rabe, co-founder of Concerned Families for ATV Safety. “Our organization believes Congress needs to conduct a thorough investigation into the full costs of child ATV accidents with an eye toward passing the recommended safety standards of the American Academy of Pediatrics – standards that keep children under 16 off these powerful vehicles which can weigh up to a 1,000 pounds and travel at speeds in excess of 70 mph. Congress has the power to reign in the costs to society associated with these unnecessary and preventable tragedies.”

“This new study puts to rest several false claims made the ATV industry,” said Carolyn Anderson, co-founder of Concerned Families for ATV Safety. “First, some claim that when someone else’s child gets killed on an ATV, it is solely their problem, but the findings our study show that these accidents do come at great costs to all of us.”

“Second, the ATV industry argues that the number of child deaths increases each year because ridership keeps going up, but once again, the findings in this study show this not to be true. In fact, the death rate is increasing at a disproportionately high rate. And third, the U.S. ATV industry wants to make the current voluntary standards mandatory because they argue that unsafe Chinese models are flooding the U.S. market and are the main reason for child deaths and serious injuries from ATV accidents. If the industry has evidence to back up this claim, they should let us see it. The truth is that since 2000, 97% of ATV recalls came from the same companies that are complaining about Chinese imports,” continued Ms. Anderson.

This study was funded by the Arabella Legacy Fund, a private charitable organization that also supports the work of Concerned Families for ATV Safety. It was prepared by Dr. Jim Helmkamp, PhD, MS, FACE (West Virginia University).

Attached are several charts illustrating the key findings of the study.

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Concerned Parents for ATV Safety is a network of parents dedicated to reducing injuries and death among children driving powerful All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs). We offer support to victims' families and provide families with information and resources to make informed decisions about their children and ATVs. Through public education we work to raise awareness of the need for adequate, common sense safety standards that keep children under 16 off ATVs, and for enforcement of ATV laws.



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Concerned Families for ATV Safety Releases New Health Cost Study on Child ATV and Bicycle Fatalities Showing Industry's Voluntary Standards Do Not Work

Preliminary Findings Indicate ATV Child Dangers on the Rise, Refute Premise of New Legislation Proposed by Sen. Ted Stevens to Make Industry Voluntary Standards Mandatory

WASHINGTON, DC –

Concerned Families for ATV Safety today released the preliminary findings of a new health costs study (http://www.atvsafetynet.org/parents.php?page=compare) that clearly shows the ATV industry's voluntary safety standards do not work. The study, which compares trends and financial costs to society of child ATV and bicycle fatalities between 2000 and 2004, shows a significant increase in child ATV deaths and death rate, as well as medical costs and overall economic costs related to these deaths, while child bike deaths and related costs have declined.

The U.S. ATV industry is current pushing a proposal in Congress recently introduced by Senator Ted Stevens (AK) that would make the current voluntary industry safety standards mandatory for all ATV manufacturers, including those made overseas in China. However, at the data from this study indicates, this approach - voluntary or not - simply has not protected our children.

Key Findings

From 2000-2004, an average of 171 children under 16 died annually in ATV crashes compared to 157 from bicycle crashes. During this 5-year period:

The number of deaths and death rate for child ATV riders increased 24%, while the number of child bicycle deaths declined 18% and the death rate decreased 17%.

Meanwhile, the total economic costs related to the youthful ATV deaths increased 45% over the 5-year period (from $673 million to $973 million) while costs decreased 5% for the young bicycle riders ($776 million to $738 million).

Medical costs related to child ATV deaths increased nearly 70% while medical costs related to child bicycle deaths decreased 20%.

Quality of life costs related to child ATV deaths increased by 44% while quality of life costs related to child bicycle deaths decreased by 4%.

Costs due to work loss from child ATV deaths increased by 46% while work loss costs related to child bicycle deaths decreased by approximately 6%.

"There's really no reason to avoid common sense, low-cost steps to reduce and prevent the number of injuries and deaths among kids from ATV accidents," said Sue Rabe, co-founder of Concerned Families for ATV Safety. "Our organization believes Congress needs to conduct a thorough investigation into the full costs of child ATV accidents with an eye toward passing the recommended safety standards of the American Academy of Pediatrics - standards that keep children under 16 off these powerful vehicles."

"This new study puts to rest several false claims made the ATV industry," said Carolyn Anderson, co-founder of Concerned Families for ATV Safety. "First, some claim that when someone else’s child gets killed on an ATV, it is solely their problem, but the findings our study show that these accidents do come at great costs to all of us."

"Second, the ATV industry argues that the number of child deaths increases each year because ridership keeps going up, but once again, the findings in this study show this not to be true. In fact, the death rate is increasing at a disproportionately high rate. And third, the U.S. ATV industry wants to make the current voluntary standards mandatory because they argue that unsafe Chinese models are flooding the U.S. market and are the main reason for child deaths and serious injuries from ATV accidents. If the industry has evidence to back up this claim, they should let us see it. The truth is that since 2000, 97% of ATV recalls came from the same companies that are complaining about Chinese imports," continued Ms. Anderson.

This study was funded by the Arabella Legacy Fund, a private charitable organization that also supports the work of Concerned Families for ATV Safety. It was prepared by Dr. Jim Helmkamp, PhD, MS, FACE.

To view the findings of the study, please visit: http://www.atvsafetynet.org/parents.php?page=compare

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Concerned Parents for ATV Safety is a network of parents dedicated to reducing injuries and death among children driving powerful All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs). We offer support to victims' families and provide families with information and resources to make informed decisions about their children and ATVs. Through public education we work to raise awareness of the need for adequate, common sense safety standards that keep children under 16 off ATVs, and for enforcement of ATV laws.



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 9, 2007

Concerned Families for ATV Safety Releases Web Video Highlighting Need for Common Sense Safety Standards

Video Questions Industry Lobbyist's "Outrageous and Irresponsible" Comments About ATV Age Limits

WASHINGTON, DC – Concerned Families for ATV Safety today released a new web video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=czqg-03M7L0) about last week's Senate Commerce Committee hearing on ATV Safety, highlighting the urgent need for common sense safety standards to keep children under 16 off powerful and deadly ATVs. The video raises serious questions about comments made by ATV Industry attorney David Murray regarding ATV age limits during the hearing.

In response to a question posed Sen. Mark Pryor (D-AR), Chair of the Consumer Affairs, Insurance, and Automotive Safety subcommittee about what age is too young to ride an ATV, Mr. Murray said, "[the industry's] voluntary standard specifies that the smallest units -- the Y-6 units -- are for ages 6 and above." Mr. Murray made this comment despite broad support from pediatricians and the medical community that because children under 16 do not have the physical and mental capacity to ride an ATVs safely, they should be kept off these powerful vehicles.

"Mr. Murray's comments that it's ok to put a 6-year-old behind the wheels of a powerful, 100-pound All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) -- that causes of tens of thousands of serious injuries and deaths each year among children -- are simply outrageous and irresponsible," said Carolyn Anderson, Concerned Families for ATV Safety Co-Founder. Instead of marketing these dangerous vehicles to children, the ATV industry ought to adopt the common sense safety standards recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics -- standards that keep children under 16 off these vehicles and require teenagers to have a license to drive ATVs, just as we do for cars."

"Perhaps Mr. Murray knows something that pediatricians don't know, but we know that the industry he represents is making a product that costs our country billions each year in medical and economic costs," said Sue Rabe, Concerned Families for ATV Safety Co-Founder. "Congress has the power to reign in these costs and protect children. Congress needs to act now."

To view the video, please visit http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=czqg-03M7L0 .

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Concerned Parents for ATV Safety is a network of parents dedicated to reducing injuries and death among children driving powerful All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs). We offer support to victim's families and provide families with information and resources to make informed decisions about their children and ATVs. Through public education we work to raise awareness of the need for adequate, common sense safety standards that keep children under 16 off ATVs, and for enforcement of ATV laws. For more information, please visit our web site at atvsafetynet.org.



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 9, 2007

Concerned Families for ATV Safety Calls on Senate Commerce Committee to Pass Common Sense Safety Standards That Keep Children under 16 off ATVs

Launches New Web Site with Facts about why ATVs and Children Don’t Mix

WASHINGTON, DC – Concerned Families for ATV Safety today called on members of the Senate Commerce Committee to address the growing problem of child injuries and deaths caused by All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) accidents. To coincide with today’s Consumer Affairs, Insurance, and Automotive Safety subcommittee hearing on this topic, the organization’s co-founders, Carolyn Anderson and Sue Rabe sent a letter (see below) to all subcommittee members surveying their views on the issue, and urging them to adopt common sense safety standards recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics – standards that keep children under 16 off these vehicles and require teenagers to have a license to drive ATVs, just as we do for cars. 

Additionally, Concerned Families launched a new web site today (www.atvsafetynet.org), featuring key facts about why ATVs and children don’t mix, resources for parents to make informed decisions about their children’s safety, and an interactive map with a sampling of reported child ATV deaths for 2007 and previous years.

In 2005, Ms. Anderson of Brockton, Massachusetts and Ms. Rabe or Turner, Oregon, along with Carol Keezer of Defiance, Ohio, founded Concerned Families for ATV Safety after each of their children had been killed driving ATVs.  They were brought together by shared grief and decided to create the organization as a way to offer support to victim’s families and raise awareness of the need for adequate, common sense safety standards that keep children under age 16 off ATVs, and for enforcement of existing ATV laws. 

“ATVs are important to many lifestyles, but pediatricians say they’re unsafe for kids, and each year, tens of thousands are severely injured or even killed in ATV accidents,” said Ms. Anderson. “We can head off this expensive, unnecessary tragedy by Congress adopting common sense safety standards that keep children under 16 off these powerful vehicles and require teenagers have a license to ride one, just like we do for cars.  We urge members of the Senate Commerce Committee to pass legislation that embraces these sound solutions.”

“Our new web site (http://www.atvsafetynet.org) provides families with information to make informed decisions about their children's safety, offer support to victims and reinforces the case made by America’s doctors that ATVs are simply too dangerous for children under 16,” said Ms. Rabe. “There’s really no reason to avoid common sense, low-cost steps that will help prevent other families from having to suffer through the loss of a child.”

Text of the letter:

Dear Senate Commerce Committee member:

Our names are Carolyn Anderson and Sue Rabe and we are co-founders of Concerned Families for ATV Safety (www.atvsafetynet.org).

Our organization is a network of parents dedicated to reducing injuries and deaths among children driving All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs). We provide families with information to make informed decisions about their children's safety, and to raise awareness of the need for adequate, common sense safety standards and enforcement of ATV laws.

ATVs are important to many lifestyles, both for recreation and work.  But each year, over 40,000 American children are seriously injured or killed riding ATVs. On April 2nd, a 14-month old child was killed on an ATV in South Carolina.

Leading medical experts say children have not developed the strength, coordination or judgment needed to safely handle these powerful vehicles, which pose a greater threat to children than many other types of recreation, such as riding a bike, playing football or skateboarding among others. This growing problem devastates families and costs our nation billions of dollars in unnecessary medical and financial costs and emotional trauma.  

We can reduce and prevent the number of injuries and deaths among children from ATV accidents by adopting common sense safety standards recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics – standards that keep children under 16 off these vehicles and require teenagers to have a license to drive ATVs, just as we do for cars. 

To that end, I know that the Consumer Affairs, Insurance, and Automotive Safety subcommittee of the Senate Commerce Committee will be holding a hearing on May 9th on the topic of ATV Safety. As a member of this committee, I am hoping that you could address the following questions concerning the use of ATVs by children.  We will be following up with a phone call and will post answers to these questions on our organization’s website, www.atvsafetynet.org.

  1. How young is too young to ride an ATV?
  1. Would you put your child or grandchild on an ATV?
  1. Pediatricians and top medical organizations have given unequivocal warnings against children driving ATVs. If you disagree with them, why?
  1. Some ATV manufacturers endorse a ban on child drivers under the age of 16 for personal watercrafts, such as jet skies. Why are personal watercrafts more dangerous for young children than powerful ATVs?

Currently, the Consumer Product Safety Commission’s limited resources constrain its ability to pursue common sense ATVs standards.  The only effective response to this national tragedy is a Congressional inquiry into the dangers these vehicles, with an eye toward banning their sale and use by children under 16. 

We can put a stop to these expensive, unnecessary tragedies by enacting common-sense safety standards.  I hope you will join me in this important effort.  For more information about our campaign, I invite you to contact me or to visit our web site at www.atvsafetynet.org

We appreciate you taking time to review this letter and look forward to your response.

Sincerely,

Carolyn Anderson                                                Sue Rabe
Brockton, MA                                                      Turner, Oregon

 

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Concerned Parents for ATV Safety is a network of parents dedicated to reducing injuries and death among children driving powerful All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs). We offer support to victim’s families and provide families with information and resources to make informed decisions about their children and ATVs. Through public education we work to raise awareness of the need for adequate, common sense safety standards that keep children under 16 off ATVs, and for enforcement of ATV laws

 

 


© 2007 Concerned Families for ATV Safety. All Rights Reserved
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